Grandfather hand carved 230 PIED wooden scale model of the Bayeux Tapestry

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230 FEET wooden model hand-carved by the grandfather of the Bayeux Tapestry to help overcome the death of his teenage son (despite the absence of three fingers on his left hand)

  • Jason Welch, 43, decided to create his replica of the Bayeux Tapestry to help cope with the death of his 16-year-old son, Ricky
  • The freelance woodcarver spent two years working on the project at his studio in North Creake, Norfolk
  • Managed to complete incredibly intricate carvings despite losing three fingers in agricultural accident at age 19
  • But he now says the 230-foot scale model is gathering dust in the shed because it’s too big to display in his house.

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A grandfather carved a wooden replica of the Bayeux Tapestry, despite having lost three of his fingers in an accident at work.

Jason Welch, 43, has always been good with a chisel, but had no idea what he was getting into when he started the project in 2011.

The freelance woodcarver, from North Creake, Norfolk, decided to create a 230-foot tapestry scale model to help cope with the grief of his 16-year-old son, Ricky, who died three years ago , and he worked hard. in its hangar since.

True dedication: Grandfather Jason Welch decided to create his replica of the Bayeux Tapestry to help cope with the death of his son Ricky, who tragically died in 2011 at the age of 16

The freelance woodcarver managed to finish the incredibly intricate carvings despite the loss of three fingers in a horrific agricultural accident at the age of 19.

The freelance woodcarver managed to finish the incredibly intricate carvings despite the loss of three fingers in a horrific agricultural accident at the age of 19.

The grandfather of two searched for weeks to get the 25 five-foot planks he needed for his project.

It took him two years to sculpt, paint, draw and sand his 135-foot long version of the historic Bayeux Tapestry.

He finally finished the job right before Christmas, but says his masterpiece is now gathering dust in his studio because it’s so big.

Mr Welch, a freelance woodcarver, said: “I love working with my hands and staying active… I had to draw all the details on these five foot panels and then chisel them out and spend hours sanding them down. . “

Jason Welch worked for three years in his studio in North Creake, Norfolk.  He searched for weeks before finding the supply of the 25 five-foot planks he needed.

Jason Welch worked for three years in his studio in North Creake, Norfolk. He searched for weeks before finding the supply of the 25 five-foot planks he needed.

Bayeux

Bayeux

Comparison: The original Bayeux tapestry was created (lower left and lower right) was created over nine centuries ago. Legend suggests that it may have been commissioned by the wife of William the Conqueror. Jason Welch’s version (top left and top right) was carved out of wood rather than embroidered in fabric

Too bad: he says the 230ft scale model is now gathering dust because it's too big to put in his house.  He hopes someone will show up to expose him

Too bad: he says the 230ft scale model is now gathering dust because it’s too big to put in his house. He hopes someone will show up to expose him

Mr Welch added: “This last part was the hardest because my hands started to hurt because I don’t have all my fingers… I just hope someone will contact us and put it some way. leaves for the year. “

Recalling the accident in which he lost his fingers, Mr Welch said: “I was about 19 and working on a farm … I had these gloves on and they got caught in a chain and a cord He pulled my hands in and my fingers went.

He added: “It was awful, it really was. I lost all the fingers on my left hand except my thumb. Fortunately, they managed to partially stitch my pinky finger up.

After two years of hard work in his studio, Jason Welch finally completed his ambitious 230-foot scale replica of the Bayeux Tapestry shortly before Christmas.

After two years of hard work in his studio, Jason Welch finally completed his ambitious 230-foot scale replica of the Bayeux Tapestry shortly before Christmas.

Jason Welch has always been interested in history and religion.  So he started working on the project without realizing that it would take up most of his free time for two years.

Jason Welch has always been interested in history and religion. So he started working on the project without realizing that it would take up most of his free time for two years.

A Slice of History: The original Bayeux tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and is actually created from a piece of embroidered fabric, not wood

A Slice of History: The original Bayeux tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and is actually created from a piece of embroidered fabric, not wood

Mr. Welch was inspired to create the masterpiece after the tragic death of his 16-year-old son Ricky in 2011.

He says the daunting task kept his mind away from the grief that left him and his partner Belinda, 42, devastated.

He added: “Originally I started it because my son passed away and I got trapped in my studio… I have always been interested in my history and my religion, so I just started to do it.”

“I just developed a passion for ancient history and thought it would be a great achievement if I could actually carve it all out of planks of wood… I never imagined it would become what it is now. I’m really happy, ”he said.

The most famous scene from the Bayeux Tapestry represents King Harold shot in the eye by an arrow.  One theory suggests the work was commissioned by the wife of William the Conqueror

The most famous scene from the Bayeux Tapestry represents King Harold shot in the eye by an arrow. One theory suggests the work was commissioned by the wife of William the Conqueror

The original Bayeux tapestry depicts the Battle of Hastings in 1066 and is actually created from a piece of embroidered fabric, not wood.

It is over nine centuries old and shows the events that led to the Norman conquest of England which culminated in the famous battle.

French legend maintains that it was commissioned and created by Queen Mathilde, the wife of William the Conqueror and his ladies-in-waiting.

The most famous scene of King Harold getting shot in the eye by an arrow.


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